fbpx

Join us at Camp George and experience true africalm!

Camp George

WATCH

OVERVIEW

Oasis of tranquillity

Immerse yourself in the legendary heart of the Klaserie Private Nature Reserve at Simbavati Camp George, an exclusive oasis of tranquility designed for the discerning traveler. Here, the legacy of founder George Huysamer harmoniously blends with the pristine wilderness, offering an authentic safari experience that captures the essence of Africa’s raw beauty. With intimate luxury suites that promise serene views and private decks, your stay with us is an invitation to witness the majestic wildlife of Kruger while enveloped in the utmost comfort.

Step into a world where art, nature, and heritage intertwine to give you a unique front-row seat to the untamed. Our curated gardens, adorned with rare South African cycads, set the stage for tranquil moments, while the thrills of game drives and bush walks await to quench your thirst for adventure. At Simbavati Camp George, every detail is crafted to ensure your safari is not just a holiday, but a moment in time where luxury and the wild dance in perfect harmony.

Read more

Why we love it

Refined Luxury

Refined bushveld retreat offering stylish suites

Art & Décor

The perfect mix of authentic tradition with a modern twist. A bespoke collection of local art, both indoors and outdoors.

Fenced Garden Oasis

Peaceful indigenous gardens with huge fever trees & rare collection of cycads

Food & Wine

Imaginative cuisine with fresh seasonal produce, paired with fine South African wine

ROOMS

Select Room

Eight Luxury Suites

Eight luxury suites with their own private deck overlook the dry riverbed. Each has a beautiful wall mural which adds a unique touch of style to the room. Each of the air-conditioned suites has a king-sized bed (convertible to twin).

It is elegantly furnished with beautiful indigenous wood furniture. There’s a large and indulgent bathroom with deep soaking tub, indoor and outdoor shower and separate toilet.

Simbavati Camp George - bedroom
Simbavati Camp George - bedroom detail
Camp George - suite
Simbavati Camp George - bedroom & bathroom
Camp George - suite deck
Simbavati Camp George - ouitdoor shower

EXPERIENCES

Things to see & do

Top Reasons to Visit

Cycads and garden

Cycad Tranquility

The tranquil gardens of Camp George are certainly a distinguishing feature with many mature fever trees and baobab trees. Birdlife is naturally attracted to the flowering shrubs so relaxing in the garden with some binoculars can be an enjoyable and restful activity. Within the garden is a rare collection of cycad species.

There are myriad ways to relax at Camp George; lounge around the expansive swimming pool, leisurely game-viewing by the waterhole. Or why not indulge in a garden picnic under the beautiful, almost luminous fever trees.

ART WORK

Local artists

Camp George showcases a good collection of modern African art with local artists.

CUISINE

Chef’s Island

Get personally involved with the chef in preparing South African dishes around the Chef’s island or in the Boma over an open fire. Choose a wine from our wine collection to compliment the dish.

Camp George food

PICNICS IN THE GARDEN

Garden Picnics

One of the special elements of Camp George are its garden picnics. Perfect for those celebrating a special anniversary but available to all romantics. You enjoy a picnic under the shade of the fever trees overlooking the productive waterhole just beyond the garden confines. Perhaps follow it up with a short siesta as the fenced garden means that you can truly relax.

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 12177
    [post_author] => 1
    [post_date] => 2023-03-30 00:05:23
    [post_date_gmt] => 2023-03-29 22:05:23
    [post_content] => 

Take a journey into Simbavati Camp George's unique essence and story. We share a glimpse into it's past, present and future, highlighting what makes it an incredible safari destination with a big heart.

Yesterday

It began in 1988 when Camp George first opened its doors. Fondly named after its founder, the late George Huysamer, the lodge is still in the family today, sharing George’s original passion for the South African bush and commitment to conservation.

George’s son, Deon, currently part-owns the lodge and is also chairman of the Klaserie Private Nature Reserve, which Simbavati Camp George is set within. His personal description taps into the heart and soul of the lodge when he says,

“The Klaserie, and Camp George specifically, was always a safe oasis where we as a family spent time together, away from the pressures of the world outside. It was a place where we invited our friends and family to share the special experiences with us. It was a place where everyone could just be. I have followed in my father’s footsteps and carried on with his legacy of a love for the bush, nature and people. I am driven by the belief that you must leave a place in a better state than in which you found it. We are only the gatekeepers of this beautiful place. It is also imperative to make a difference in the lives of the communities around us.”

Today

It is an oasis of tranquility for all who stay there.

Along with Simbavati and Deon, Frank Kilbourn is Simbavati Camp George's other owner. He is the chairman of Strauss & Co and responsible for the beautiful art found in the lodge as well as the complete collection of South African cycads on its grounds.

A love for nature and a sense of tranquility the wilderness brings is what spreads through Simbavati Camp George.

Set within the glorious Klaserie wilderness, the lodge attracts and surpasses the expectations of guests searching for the ultimate safari experience in one of the best wildlife areas in Kruger, underpinned by a sense of peace and beauty. The incredible food, lush lodge grounds and beauty in the attention to detail makes it a dreamy experience.

The staff ensure every guest leaves as a friend, fulfilled and at peace.

Tomorrow

Simbavati Camp George has a big heart, just like its namesake and founder did. A passion for supporting the surrounding Klaserie community and its children is especially important in making a real difference to the future.

In 2007, identifying a need to support the families of the lodge staff, their children were invited to spend the school holidays at Simbavati Camp George. Here they learnt about the wild environment around them and the importance of conserving it.

In the lush gardens, under the beautiful trees, the first lessons took place. The seeds were sown for what is Eco Children today.

Learn more about supporting Eco Children’s work around student bursaries, nutrition and educational development on their website.

Throughout the years, over it's past, in it's present and into the future, Simbavati Camp George is a lodge with heart. Set in the most wondrous wilderness, inside the Klaserie Private Nature Reserve, this tranquil and welcoming safari lodge is a haven of peace for guests and offers the most riveting safari experience. It is truly a well-rounded and special destination.

[post_title] => Camp George- Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => camp-george-yesterday-today-and-tomorrow [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2023-05-23 15:49:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2023-05-23 13:49:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.simbavati.com/copy-why-choose-full-board-and-activities/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Camp George - suite deck

Camp George

Camp George- Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 5105
    [post_author] => 7
    [post_date] => 2021-09-06 07:45:20
    [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-06 07:45:20
    [post_content] => 

Disconnect to Reconnect

Growing up in a family that loves nature and wildlife, I have a long history of travelling for leg-numbing hours in the back of the land-rover. We kids had special beds and an assortment of books and games to keep us entertained. And let’s admit, quiet too. All as we headed for some new and suitably adventurous destination to go camping.

Our arrival at the camp would be a mix of excitement and groans. No scampering to a pool. We had to get set up first before it got dark, or before we could go out for an activity. But there were evenings around the campfire with stories until late into the night. Then we would head to bed - only to lie awake listening. And sometimes being terrified of the noises around us. But that's invariably part of the excitement and good for new stories for the next day! These are still some of our fondest memories growing up.

These days, of course, there is the option of coming to a safari lodge, where everything is organised ready for you. Families on safari have much less to think about, let alone do. We take care of your welcoming tent, your meals and your game drives, giving you much more time to relax.

And that's what one should get out of family trips away - an opportunity to make memories, have fun. And, most importantly, reconnect as a family. All the while, having a safe environment for kids to relax and be kids. And for adults to have a little pampering.

Families on Safari - the crucial question of age

So what age should your kids be for a safari? The ideal age to safely appreciate game drives on safari is from around 8 years or older. That's why we chose to set the limit at Amani and Camp George to eight years old. However, we are a little more flexible at River Lodge and have happily hosted kids of all ages. The same goes for Homestead where there’s no minimum age either. One does need to consider exactly where you go, though. Many safari lodges have a minimum age limit, mainly for safety reasons. If you have young kids on a game vehicle, the guide will not go as close to some predator sightings for obvious reasons. Plus remember that in the Kruger, malaria is a consideration, especially in our summer months.

For game drives, children need to be over 6 to take part in shared game drives at River Lodge. Sometimes it is possible to pre-organise a private game drive vehicle (at an extra cost per day). This gives more more flexibility to a family safari as you can go for shorter drives, which really helps for little ones with a smaller attention span.

How do the kids stay amused at Simbavati?

Our family-friendly lodges try to be flexible and tailors activities according to the kids - their ages, interests and weather. The options are varied, both indoors and outdoors, ranging from crafts, nature hunts, track mouldings, elephant dung cricket, card and paper making. All the way to seasonal delights of frogging and mud wallowing - yes dirt equals fun!

For older kids, there are nature walks, baking with the chefs, macro photography, learning local languages to a junior tracker or ranger course. Which of course comes with a badge or certificate.

At River Lodge in the Timbavati, there's even a Cubs Club. This is equipped with TV, DVD’s, games, archery practice area, books, maps and a discovery nook with bugs, bones, dung & identification tools. So everyone gets something! But each lodge has a refreshing swimming pool and some can even do spa treatments. Camp George and Amani have fenced in gardens which means that kids have space to play, without anxious parents. 

[post_title] => Tips on Families on Safari [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => tips-on-families-on-safari [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-15 19:53:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-15 17:53:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://simbavati.com/?p=5105 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Simbavati River Lodge - family safaris

Amani

Camp George

Homestead

People

River Lodge

Tips on Families on Safari

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 5082
    [post_author] => 9
    [post_date] => 2021-09-06 07:10:40
    [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-06 05:10:40
    [post_content] => 

Our ‘Secret Seven’ wildlife species in Africa are rarely seen and elusive animals. Well, the name says it all.

These are the most secretive animals and even many frequent visitors to National Parks and wildlife reserves haven’t been fortunate enough to see them all.  The secret seven comprise aardvark, African wild cat, civet, large spotted genet, pangolin, porcupine and serval.

In a lifetime career working in the bush I’ve been lucky enough to see six of our Secret Seven. But one I am yet to see in all my years..

The main reason these guys are such a rare ‘spot’ is due to the fact that they are mostly nocturnal, solitary and shy animals. Let’s run through our list so that you’ll be ready to share in the excitement if you do spot one. It’s usually quite a fleeting sighting and they are certainly camera-shy!

Aardvark

Afrikaans Name: Erdvark

This animal has long ears, a long pig-like snout and a very thick tail. Their skin is almost bare and of a yellow-grey colour while the hair on the legs is generally darker in colour. Plus their hindquarters are also much heavier than the front quarters and their shoulders are much lower than the crop. Their limbs are extremely powerful and the feet, especially their front feet, have strong claws adapted for digging and for breaking into anthills. The aardvark is very adaptable and occurs in areas where the soil is not very compact and where a sufficient number of termites are. 

Male aardvarks are slightly more heavily built than the females. Both are generally solitary. They range widely seeking food, with those noses of theirs held close to ground as their sense of smell is amazing. They are nocturnal (active at night) and usually sleep in a hole that they fill up behind them.

Speaking of their holes. You may be surprised that they have three holes with three different uses:

Hole 1: They live in this hole as well as give birth to their young in this hole. They give birth to a single young and they are born from July to September after a gestation period of +-7 months.

Hole 2: This acts as a temporary shelter from bad weather or unexpected weather or if they travelled a bit too far they will seek shelter before moving back to hole 1.

Hole 3: A small excavation for seeking food.

They can dig at unbelievable rates. Sometimes when they are done with their holes, if they are in good condition, then other animals will move in! They'll make & shape them into dens or shelters for themselves.  All and all, you can call the Aardvark the architect of bush.

African Wild Cat

Afrikaans Name: Vaalboskat

The second of our secret seven wildlife species is a slender animal resembling a grey house cat! Their colour varies from grey to dark grey, from reddish to dusky red stripes on their legs and tail. African wild cats are larger than small spotted cats and they usually have more spots. These cats can easily interbreed with domestic cats, but the cross-breeds will have shorter legs and lack the reddish tinge on the back of their ears which African wild cats are known for, however the cross-breeds will have a red nose instead of the normal black nose. You can find these cats everywhere, provided there is sufficient dense thicket, tall grass and rocks for shelters.

These shy, cunning animals are usually solitary, except for mating season when one or more males will be around a single female. 2 to 5 young are born any time of the year with the peak being between September and March, after a gestation period of +-2 months. They are mainly nocturnal. But you may be lucky and see them in the late afternoon at sunset. They are very territorial and both sexes will defend their areas. Although these cats are mainly terrestrial they are very good climbers, especially if they are being pursued. They also sometimes hunt from trees. I have been very lucky to have seen them, but only 2 individuals in my career.

African Civet

Afrikaans Name: Siwet

This cat-like animal is a whitish-grey with indistinct spots on the forequarters and regular black spots which merge into stripes on their hindquarters. Their legs are black and their tail white, bushy and ringed with a black tip. These animals prefer woodlands with thick undergrowth. They also like to be in well-watered surroundings. African civets are exclusively nocturnal and are most active during the early hours of the evening or just before sunrise. 

They are mainly solitary animals. Civets can climb trees but they mostly move on the ground, you will find these guys usually along footpaths and walking purposefully with their heads held down. They are extremely shy animals. If you disturb them, they will either stand motionless or lie down on the ground. Depending on good camouflage rather than fight. One to four young are born between August to December after a gestation period of +-2 months. These animals can live up to 12 years if they don’t get killed by lion, leopard or pythons.

I have been lucky enough to see four individuals and the last one was my best sighting; a civet being chased by a leopard! He survived due to the fact that the leopard wasn’t hunting or anything. It seemed that they just accidentally walked into each other in tall grass. Personally, I think the leopard got just as much of a fright as the civet.

Large Spotted Genet

Afrikaans Name: Grootkolmuskejaatkat

The fourth one in the secret seven roll-call is a rather small, cat-like animal. The large spotted genet are white or greyish-white with dark spots and stripes. Their tail is long and dark with white rings. The species has been split into the Large spotted genet with black spots, stripes and rings. And the Rusty-spotted genet with rust-brown stripes and spots. These animals like to be in well-watered areas with sufficient undergrowth. 

Usually solitary animals, but they can sometimes be found in pairs. They are nocturnal animals and will emerge a few hours after sunset. During the day they sleep in old aardvark holes (our architect of the bush, remember?), spring hare holes or sometimes they will sleep in hollow tree stumps. They are mainly terrestrial but will either take shelter or hunt in trees. Their movements are watchful and furtive and when they run they keep their heads down and their tails horizontal.

These animals love dog pellets so people that live on farms where they keep dogs have to keep the dog food inside or they end up stealing the dog pellets.

Porcupine

Afrikaans Name: Ystervark

These guys are the largest rodent in the region. Their bodies are covered in quills, spines and flattened black bristles. Quills are generally black and white and very distinctive.

Porcupines are usually solitary but three or more can be found using the same shelters. Sometimes at the holes you will find bones which the porcupines drag to the shelters where they gnaw on the bones for calcium.

These guys are very adaptable and you can find them everywhere except in forests and desserts. So you may see them away from conservation areas. Indeed they are the worst enemy to veggie gardens and agricultural lands and cause a lot of damage.   

They can travel long distances looking for food at night. These guys might look slow but they can run really fast if being pursued by a predator. Speaking of dangerous encounters for porcupine, they are pretty feisty. The quills by the neck and hindquarters are longer and thinner. They raise these up to make the porcupine look bigger and more fearsome to its enemies.

Look at this encounter between a leopard and a porcupine in the Kruger...

Quills cannot be shot out or released as folklore says, (cool though that would be). They actually back up into the predator where the quills will stick and remain in the predator. Lions and leopards struggle after an altercation between them and a porcupine as the quills cause infections and festering sores, making it difficult to hunt, eat or even drinking water, so they become weak and easy targets to their own enemies. Some people working in the bush actually refer to porcupines as the serial killer of the bush.

Serval

Afrikaans Name: Tierboskat

The serval is a slender animal with long legs, a rather small, rounded head and large ears. Colour varies from dull white to light golden-yellow with black stripes down the neck and irregular black spots on the body. The serval is sometimes confused with a young cheetah cubs as they look very similar. Yet so different if you know what to look for. Servals prefer thicker, more humid types of woodland with sufficient shelter and water. 

These animals usually forage alone, although pairs sometimes hunt together, even in swampy areas. They are mainly nocturnal but you may see them in the early morning and late afternoon. They can run fast for short distances. At night they range far in search of food, using roads and footpaths to avoid difficult terrain. Although they are excellent tree climbers they are mainly terrestrial. These guys can live up to +-12 years unless their predators like lion and crocodile get to them first.

Pangolin

Afrikaans Name: Ietermagog

And last, but not least, in our secret seven line-up is probably the animal that most keen safari visitors would LOVE to see. These guys have got very hard, dark grey-brown scales which cover the body like roof tiles, their defining characteristic. It’s a very odd animal. You very rarely see them, being even more elusive than the other secret seven clan.

Pangolin walk on their hind legs with the front legs held off the ground, only touching now and then. The front feet have long, curved claws which are used to dig. They like sandy soil in dry fairly humid types of savannah with adequate shelters.

Pangolin are usually solitary animals and move about noisily as they brush against bushes and branches. They are also mainly nocturnal but you can occasionally see them during the day. If they suspect any intrusion they will stand on their back legs supported by their tails. When threatened they will roll themselves into a ball. They live in old Aardvark holes and hunt for food at night. They eat mainly ants and sometimes termites. Intriguingly they also emit a really foul odour when threatened.

These guys can live a good life of over 12 years in the wild and have no natural enemies. Their worst enemies are humans, unfortunately. Sadly they are the most trafficked animals in the world, mainly sought after for their scales. Again, another sad story of ignorance, greed and misinformation about non-existent health benefits. This animal has evaded me watching to catch a slighting for 9 years and going. So Mr Pangolin, watch out! Our cat and mouse game ain’t over just quite yet. I’ve still got my eyes open and I will see you soon!

So as the sundowner drinks come to an end, and the night drive begins, keep your eyes peeled for one of these secret seven gems. 

[post_title] => Secret Seven wildlife of the Timbavati & Klaserie [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => the-secret-seven-wildlife-of-the-timbavati-klaserie [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-02-04 15:04:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-02-04 13:04:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://simbavati.com/?p=5082 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
Secret seven wildlife - aarvark

Amani

Camp George

Hilltop Lodge

Homestead

Kruger Klaserie

Kruger Timbavati

River Lodge

Wildlife & Safari

Secret Seven wildlife of the Timbavati & Klaserie

/ Camp George

REGIONS

Getting There

Simbavati Camp George is approx 60 to 90 minutes from Hoedspruit Eastgate airport, depending on how comfortable you are driving on gravel roads. It can be accessed via a rental car.

Directions from Hoedspruit Airport

As you exit the Airport, turn left for Klaserie Game Reserve onto Argyle Road. Continue until you reach the Enkhulu control gate of the Timbavati Private Nature Reserve.  Please note that continuous cell phone reception ends here.

At this gate you will tell security you are going to Camp George/Amani/Homestead in the Klaserie. You DO NOT pay an entrance fee at this gate. Immediately after the gate, there’s a cattle grid in front you. Do not cross this grid. Instead you turn immediately left before the grid and follow the road as it doubles back on itself and then curves to the right to head to the Klaserie main gate (Incheni Gate). This takes about 10 to 15 mins drive.

At the gate, you will be required to pay an entrance fee in cash. (This changes on a yearly basis).  This gate is open from 6am to 6pm. The lodge would have at this stage sent a QR code to the gate for your entry (Passport or SA ID information is required for your QR code). 

Go through the gate and continue straight on the main road for quite some distance (approx 20 minutes) until you reach a big cell/radio tower. At the cell tower you will find a sign on a stone plinth on your left saying Northumberland/Fife/Klaseriemond/Durham/Dundee East. Turn right.

Follow the powerline on your left for approx 3.2km. Where the powerline heads away from the road, you will find a sign on your rights saying Camp George/Amani Safari Camp. Turn left here. 

Continue until the next sign (on a stone plinth) and turn right here. At the next stone plinth/sign, you continue straight on for Camp George. At the triangle, keep right. The fork will fork again and you keep left. At the next fork, keep right. This will take you to Camp George down the hill.

Aim to arrive by 2.30pm, if possible so that you have ample time to settle in before the game drive. If you are going to be late due to unforeseen circumstances, please let us know on (015) 004 1400

Note: Please do NOT rely on your GPS after Hoedspruit. It will lead you onto the incorrect roads where you could get loss and stuck!

Timing 

From Johannesburg Airport – ± 6½ to 7 hours’ drive (505km)

From Kruger Airport – 3 + hours (190km)

From Hazyview – 2 to 2 ½ hours (140km via the R40)

From the Three Rondavels view point (last point on the Panorama route, 145km) – 2½ hours (so depart by 12 noon latest).

Directions from Johannesburg to Simbavati Camp George (± 6½ – 7 hour drive)

The most direct route is via N4 then Dullstroom to Lydenburg and Ohrigstad and onto Hoedspruit. However some people prefer to take the northern route via Polokwane and Tzaneen as there are fewer potholes. See Downloadable Directions. 

From Johannesburg take the N12 to Witbank (Emalahleni) and continue on the N4 towards Nelspruit.  (From Pretoria, take the N4 to Witbank).  Follow the N4 and turn left to Belfast (Off ramp R33/R540). Once in Belfast, turn right into Voortrekker Street and continue straight on the R540 to Dullstroom.  

Drive straight through Dullstroom and continue to Lydenburg (name change to Mashishing) on the R540. At the T-junction turn left into Lydenburg (Mashishing) into Viljoen Street (R36).  Turn left again into Voortrekker Street.  Turn right into De Clercq Street and follow the R36 through Ohrigstad.  After the Abel Erasmus pass, the R36 turns left to Tzaneen. Do not turn left here. Instead continue straight on the R527 to Hoedspruit.

In Hoedspruit, continue straight. After the bridge crossing the railway line, turn right at the four way stop and continue south on the R40 for another 6.4km.  Turn left onto the D1909 (Argyle Road). The sign says Timbavati/Eastgate Airport road.  Then follow the Hoedspruit directions to the Lodge.

Directions from Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport or Hazyview

KMIA – 3+ hours (195km) * Hazyview – Allow 2½ hours (140km)

The most direct route from Kruger Intl Airport is via the R40 thorough White River and Hazyview. Similarly if you are staying in or near Hazyview, the R40 north is the direct route. Just 6.5km south of Hoedspruit. You turn right onto the Timbavati/Eastgate Airport road. Allow 1½ hours to get from Hazyview to the Timbavati turnoff. Then another hour to get to the Lodge. Once on the Timbavati Road, you immediately pass the Eastgate Airport. Then follow the Hoedspruit directions to the Lodge.

Alternative Panorama route if staying at a Hazyview Lodge: 

The R40 is a difficult road given the number of slow trucks and cars as well as many pedestrians. It takes longer than you would expect. 

So if you have time, we recommend enjoying a tour of the Panorama route via the Blyde River canyon. Note that this is a longer route (240km from Hazyview to your Lodge (or 3¾ hours driving). En route you can stop off at the Bournes Luck potholes, Gods Window and the Three Rondavels

TIP: It takes approx 2½ + hours to get to the camp from the Three Rondavels viewpoint. So don’t leave the Three Rondavels later than 12 noon. Assuming you spend 1½ hours at the various stopping off points, we recommend leaving your lodge by 8.30am.

ROOMS & FACILITIES

Each of the eight luxury suites has a king-sized bed (which can be converted to twin), dressing table, minibar, air conditioning, ceiling fan, and a full en suite bathroom with oval bath tub, double vanity, separate toilet, indoor shower. Outside is a private terrace with al fresco shower. Two inter-leading units are available for families traveling together (to make a two bedroom, two bathroom unit).


In- room Facilities
● Private terrace overlooking dry riverbed
● Air-conditioning – for cooling and heating
● Ceiling fan
● Minibar with drinks and snacks
● Coffee and tea-making facilities
● Bathroom – bath, indoor and outdoor shower, double vanity
● Complimentary eco-friendly amenities
● Hair-dryer
● Mini-safe for storing valuables
● Room equipped with electronic eco-friendly insect spray (10 min intervals)
● Laundry service – laundry bag in room

Lodge Facilities & Good to Know
● Main lodge with sitting area with books and board games
● Interesting collection of modern African art
● Complimentary wifi in rooms and in main guest areas
● Convivial bar (though the bar chairs are not made for small people)
● Dining room leading out to alfresco dining on the terrace
● Swimming pool set within in mature, fenced garden
● Open air boma around a campfire, overlooking the dry riverbed
● Safari spa – one treatment room
● Fully equipped gym
● Unique collection of Cycads

OUR DETAILED

2024-2026Rates

Enquire about our SA Resident Offers.

01 May 2024 – 05 Jan 202506 Jan 2025 – 20 Dec 202521 Dec 2025 – 04 Jan 2026
Per Person SharingR11,200
R12,500

R13,750
Per SingleR14,925R16,625R18,288
Child R5,600R6,250R6,875

FINE PRINT

Inclusions

Booking Policy

General Information

Children are welcome from 8 years upwards and can join the adult game drive.  There are two inter-leading rooms so that a family of four can enjoy two bedrooms with two en suite bathrooms.

Note: There is no kids centre. So if you have younger kids, then you may wish to consider Simbavati River Lodge as alternative?

The Kruger is a malarial area so we recommend that you take anti-malaria prophylaxis. Mosquitos are less prevalent in the winter. We also recommend anti-mosquito repellent to stop you from getting bitten.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What is a typical pattern of safari activities?

What’s the ideal length of stay?

Is there wifi?

What should I wear for a game drive?

What should I wear for a bush walk?

Get in Contact

Managers

Inneke and Manie Esterhuizen

Lodge telephone number: 015 004 1400 

Reservations: +27 87 151 4520

  1. Detailed description of services
    Simbavati Camp George is a business in the Tourism industry that provides accommodation services.
  2. Delivery policy
    Subject to availability and receipt of payment, requests will be processed within 2 days and receipt confirmed by way of email.
  3. Return and Refunds policy
    The provision of services by Simbavati Camp George is subject to availability. In cases of unavailability, Simbavati Camp George will refund the client in accordance with our standard terms and conditions.
  4. Customer Privacy policy
    Simbavati Camp George shall take all reasonable steps to protect the personal information of users. For the purpose of this clause, “personal
    information” shall be defined as detailed in the Promotion of Access to Information Act 2 of 2000 (PAIA). The PAIA may be downloaded from:
    http://www.lawsofsouthafrica.up.ac.za/index.php/current-legislation.
  5. Payment options accepted
    Payment may be made via Visa or MasterCard or by bank transfer into the Simbavati Camp George bank account, the details of which will be provided on request.
  6. Card acquiring and security
    Card transactions will be acquired for Simbavati Camp George via PayGate (Pty) Ltd who are the approved payment gateway for all South African Acquiring Banks. DPO PayGate uses the strictest form of encryption, namely Secure Socket Layer 3 (SSL3) and no Card details are stored on the website. Users may go to www.paygate.co.za to view their security certificate and security policy.
  7. Customer details separate from card details
    Customer details will be stored by Simbavati Camp George separately from card details which are entered by the client on DPO PayGate’s secure site. For more detail on DPO PayGate refer to www.paygate.co.za.
  8. Merchant Outlet country and transaction currency
    The merchant outlet country at the time of presenting payment options to the cardholder is South Africa. Transaction currency is
    South African Rand (ZAR).
  9. Responsibility
    Simbavati Camp George takes responsibility for all aspects relating to the transaction including sale of goods and services sold on this website, customer service and support, dispute resolution and delivery of the service.
  10. Country of domicile
    This website is governed by the laws of South Africa and Simbavati Camp George chooses as its domicilium citandi et executandi for all purposes under this agreement, whether in respect of court process, notice, or other documents or communication of whatsoever nature Portion 9 of Portion 7, Farm Northumberland, Number 31 Registered, Hoedspruit, Limpopo, 1380.
  11. Variation
    Simbavati Camp George may, in its sole discretion, change this agreement or any part thereof at any time without notice.
  12. Company information
    This website is run by SARO AI (Pty) Ltd based in South Africa trading as Simbavati Management Services and with registration number 2018/313230/07 and 3 directors.
  13. Simbavati Camp George contact details
    Company Physical Address: Portion 9 of Portion 7, Farm Northumberland, Number 31 Registered, Hoedspruit, Limpopo, 1380
    Email: res@simbavati.com Telephone: 087 151 4520